Metro Plan Would Subsidize Uber And Lyft Fares To Fill Late-Night Service Gap (2-13-19)

(Gene J. Puskar/AP)

Metro would subsidize an Uber, Lyft or other on-demand trip for late-night workers under a plan the agency is proposing to the ride-hail services.

The subsidized trips — up to $3 per ride — are meant to make up for the loss of late-night service but would be available only to workers, not people out enjoying entertainment or events.

Metro, which has been criticized by riders and D.C. officials for wanting to extend its moratorium on late-night service another year and use the extra time to catch up on maintenance, is expected to issue a request for proposals soon that will outline its goals for the estimated $1 million program.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)

New DC Signs Banning Right Turns On Red To Go Up Starting Feb. 19 (2-11-19)

WASHINGTON — “No right turn on red” signs will start going up in dozens of new D.C. locations starting Feb. 19, as long as weather permits.

The District Department of Transportation is banning right turns on red at about 100 new intersections throughout the city, and the signs will be installed over the next six months by the end of July.

The effort supports Mayor Muriel Bowser’s Vision Zero Initiative that was launched in 2016, aimed at eliminating traffic deaths and serious injuries in the nation’s capital by 2024.

“We have taken a number of approaches to make intersections across the District safer, and banning right turns on red in over 100 intersections is one of those approaches,” DDOT Director Jeff Marootian told WTOP.

Another Self-Driving Car Startup Is Starting Small, And That’s A Good Thing (2-7-19)

Boston-based self-driving startup Optimus Ride said on Thursday that it will provide rides in its golf cart-sized vehicles to tenants of a $1.4 billion mixed-use development project in Reston, Virginia, starting later this year. It will be a very modest deployment of the technology — three vehicles on a fixed loop to and from the parking facility — but it underscores the need for self-driving car operators to rein in their ambitions before going public.

Read Full Story Here (via The Verge)

Could AI-Powered Traffic Cameras Finally Stop Distracted Driving? (2-3-19)

Getty Images. GETTY

The other evening as I worked in a coffee shop on a busy intersection at rush hour in Washington, DC, I was struck by the sheer magnitude of the number of drivers passing by that were looking down at their phones. Over the hour I watched, at least half of the drivers who were stopped at the red light looked down at their phone screens at least once, hurriedly scrolling and typing away, entirely oblivious to the fact that the light had turned green until they received a helpful honk from the car behind. When the light was green at least a quarter of those passing through were glancing down at their phones or fixated on some knob or dial on their console, glancing up only sporadically to see if the car ahead was braking. While driverless cars may eventually free us to spend our commutes entirely on our phones, in the meantime, could AI-powered traffic cameras finally rid of the dangers of distracted drivers?

Read Full Story Here (via Forbes)

DC Bill Would Give Scooter, E-Bike Riders More Legal Rights (1-24-19)

A Bird scooter sits parked on a street corner on April 17, 2018 in San Francisco.

A bill introduced in D.C. this week would give e-bike and electric scooter riders more rights when they are involved in crashes.

Council Member Mary Cheh introduced a bill on Tuesday designed to give e-bike and electric scooter riders the same protections as pedestrians and regular bike riders.

The proposed amendment to Cheh’s 2016 Motor Vehicle Collision Recovery Act would mandate that scooter and e-bike riders be found at least 50 percent liable before their civil claims for damages are denied.

“The prospect of this law applying to them is if they’ve been seriously injured and they’ve been applying for damages,” Cheh said. “You are never barred from recovery if it was an accident with a car unless it’s more your fault than the car’s fault.”

Read Full Story Here (via NBC Washington)