Car Vending Machine Unveiled In DC Area (6-7-18)

Dive Brief:

  • Online used car sales site Carvana has opened a vehicle vending machine in the Washington, DC suburb of Gaithersburg, MD.
  • The eight-story, all glass tower holds up to 30 vehicles and is fully automated. Customers receive a large, specialized coin to retrieve their vehicle from the vending machine.
  • The new vending machine is Carvana’s 10th, joining others in Houston; Dallas; Austin, TX; San Antonio, TX; Nashville, TN; Raleigh, NC; Charlotte, NC; Jacksonville, FL and Tampa, FL.

Read Full Story Here (via Smart Cities Dive)

Your Guide To The Capitals’ Victory Parade (6-12-18)

The parade doesn’t officially kick-off until 11 a.m., but fans were lining up along the parade route hours before then. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)

WASHINGTON — It’s not every day that a city gets to celebrate a championship.

With the Capitals winning the first Stanley Cup in franchise history, D.C. will be celebrating in a big way with a parade through downtown, then a rally on the National Mall on Tuesday, June 12.

Unlike previous events on the National Mall, organizers have not put together an extensive list of banned items, however there will be no alcohol, glass or drones allowed.

The federal government will be open during the parade but the White House is encouraging agencies to grant employees two hours off during the festivities. More details can be found below.

As with any big parade, there will be a slew of street closures and parking restrictions. Here’s what you need to know before the parade kicks off.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)

Are Dockless Bikeshare Systems Changing Washington’s Biking Culture? (6-2-18)

Dockless ride-share bikes are now a common sight on District sidewalks. Available via a mobile app, they offer a cheaper alternative to other transportation options. (Mark Miller/The Washington Post)

The new dockless bike-share companies that have taken off in the District are attracting a different kind of customer than the traditional Capital Bikeshare system: Their riders are more racially diverse, slightly younger and less affluent, according to transportation officials and an academic review of the services.

A new study by Virginia Tech found that a good share of the bikes are taking trips to areas that are historically majority-minority, a clear distinction when compared to the share of trips made on Capital Bikeshare bikes, the city-sponsored system that is known for its distinctive red bikes and docking stations.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)

DFHV The Evolution Of The Ride: Brand Recognition Campaign for the DC Department of For-Hire Vehicles

“The challenge was helping people to understand the agency’s evolution from taxicab and limousine regulator to transportation innovator, bringing new strategies to the marketplace that provide convenient, comfortable and safe access to rides.”

Case Description

Seaberry developed a brand-recognition campaign for the DC Department of For-Hire Vehicles (DFHV). The DFHV replaced the former DC Taxi Commission, which was responsible for the regulation of the city’s taxi fleet, maintaining a status quo of pricing and policies that favored drivers in a one-choice industry.

The DFHV ensures there is choice, competition and innovation across DC’s new transportation ecosystem, which now includes taxis, limousines, private vehicles-for-hire and ride-sharing platforms such as Uber, Lyft and Via. DFHV’s aggressive strategy in recent years has become a model for forward-thinking governments adopting plans to treat “transportation as a service” (TaaS). Ernest Chrappah, DFHV’s director, believes that reinventing modes of transportation is essential to promote job growth, seed entrepreneurship and reduce carbon emissions. Additionally, the strategy is necessary to make transportation in the District meaningfully accessible for the aged, veterans, people with disabilities and those who cannot afford current options.

Furthermore, the strategy provides a foundation to address increasing congestion and the lack of available space to build new parking facilities or light rail in many cities. Chrappah was recently named International Regulator of the Year by the International Association of Transportation Regulators (IATR).

Seaberry worked closely with DFHV to develop the “Evolution of the Ride” marketing campaign to raise awareness about the DFHV’s “disruption,” which is transforming the agency’s focus to entrepreneurship from growth-stifling regulation.

The challenge was helping people understand the agency’s transportation evolution from taxicab and limousine regulator to transportation innovator, bringing novel strategies to the marketplace to provide convenient, comfortable and safe access to rides.

Read Full Story Here (via SeaBerry)

Most People Expect Driverless Cars To Become Common, And They Worry About It (6-4-18)

A driverless Daimler AG Mercedes-Benz AMG E63 S car maneuvers to a parking space during a demonstration in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 28, 2018. (Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg)

Most Americans think autonomous cars will be quite common within 15 years, though 74 percent of people say they don’t expect to have one and two-thirds say they wouldn’t want to walk or ride a bicycle anywhere near one.

Confusing? That’s in part because the results come from three different recent surveys on Americans’ attitudes toward autonomous cars.

Taken together, however, they underscore widespread misgivings about the autonomous vehicles that people expect will be among them shortly, the challenge that automakers face in marketing them, and a need for safety reassurances from federal regulators.

Most Americans — 70 percent, according to an HNTB survey being released Monday — have softened to the idea that driverless cars factor in their future, whether they plan to ride in one or not.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)