Reining in Ride Hailing Is Critical (8-14-18)

Traditional taxis vie for street space with ride-hailing vehicles from Uber and Lyft in New York City. Something has to give. Mary Altaffer/AP

City leaders need to reckon with the reality that sometimes shared ride services are not part of the answer to urban congestion, argues transportation researcher Bruce Schaller.

Last week, the New York City Council took a big step toward stemming the traffic-clogging proliferation of Uber and Lyft vehicles, temporarily halting issuance of new vehicle licenses as well as authorizing a wage floor for ride-hailing service drivers. The historic bills, which Mayor Bill de Blasio signed into law on Tuesday, signal that these companies can no longer run roughshod over legislative bodies in pursuit of growth and eventual profits.

But there has been pushback to the idea, contained in both the legislation and in my recent report, “The New Automobility,” that Uber and Lyft’s impact on big-city traffic needs to be contained. Some of this resistance comes, not unexpectedly, from the companies themselves, which strongly object to the moratorium while also accepting the wage-related provisions.

Perhaps more notable was criticism from other quarters. In a recent CityLab post, for example, Zipcar co-founder Robin Chase wrote that focusing on ride service growth “sets us up for failure” because Uber, Lyft, taxis and the like “account for just 1.7 percent of miles traveled by urban dwellers, while travel by personal cars accounts for 86 percent.” She calls for making “all shared modes of transit better and more attractive than driving alone.”

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Here’s How Much Millennials Spend On Uber And Lyft In Major US Cities Every Month (7-14-18)

Millennials spend an average $110 a month on Uber in San Francisco. Spencer Platt/Getty
  • Between Uber and Lyft, millennials are spending upwards of $100 a month on ridesharing services in some cities.
  • Money managing app Empower surveyed 50,000 users across the US to determine how much millennials pay for Uber and Lyft per month in 29 cities.
  • Uber and Lyft were born in San Francisco and users there spend the most.

Getting around major metropolitan areas can be hard on foot and at times unbearable using underground transportation. Ridesharing apps like Uber and Lyft thrive in areas with a highly concentrated population — and some millennials are spending over $100 a month to use them.

Read Full Story Here (via Business Insider)

What If You Could Plan And Pay For You Trip Around The DC Area With One Click? (7-9-18)

Metro bus makes it way down 16th street in in downtown Washington, Wednesday, March 16, 2016. The Metro subway system that serves the nation’s capital and its Virginia and Maryland suburbs shut down for a full-day fo an emergency safety inspection of its third-rail power cables. Making for unusual commute, as the lack of service is forcing some people on the roads, while others are staying home or teleworking. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON — A powerful business group that has thrown its support behind Metro funding and toll lanes from Richmond to Baltimore is now calling for changes to unify how we pay to get around.

In a document being released Monday, the Greater Washington Partnership asks transportation systems across the region to unify payments in a single interchangeable way that would allow one-click planning and purchase of a trip that could feature bike share, scooters, Metro, commuter rail and buses.

“What we want, ultimately, is one seamless integrated platform for folks to be able to plan for and pay for a trip across all public and private transport options in the capital region of Baltimore to Richmond,” the group’s Transportation Policy Director Joe McAndrew said.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)

Activities, Road Closures Abound During DC’s July 4 Celebration (6-25-18)

Fireworks explode over the Lincoln Memorial, left, Washington Monument, center, and U.S. Capitol, at the National Mall in Washington, Tuesday, July 4, 2017, during the Fourth of July celebration. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

WASHINGTON — The United States’ 242nd birthday brings fireworks, music and parades — which in turn bring crowds and road closures.

The National Park Service has announced the schedule for July 4 festivities around the National Mall and Capitol grounds. Events include:

  • Smithsonian Folklife Festival: 11:30 a.m.–6 p.m.
    (National Mall, between 12th and 14th streets Northwest)
  • National Independence Day Parade: 11:45 a.m.–2 p.m.
    (Constitution Avenue Northwest from 7th to 17th streets Northwest)
  • A Capitol Fourth concert: 8–9:30 p.m.
    (U.S. Capitol West Lawn)
  • Fireworks display: 9:09–9:27 p.m.
    (Over the National Mall)

Note: Transit use is encouraged. The park service suggests using Metrorail stations other than Smithsonian or Federal Triangle, which typically have the most traffic on July 4. The National Mall area immediately outside the Smithsonian station is also closed due to a re-turfing project. 

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Your Guide To The Capitals’ Victory Parade (6-12-18)

The parade doesn’t officially kick-off until 11 a.m., but fans were lining up along the parade route hours before then. (WTOP/Neal Augenstein)

WASHINGTON — It’s not every day that a city gets to celebrate a championship.

With the Capitals winning the first Stanley Cup in franchise history, D.C. will be celebrating in a big way with a parade through downtown, then a rally on the National Mall on Tuesday, June 12.

Unlike previous events on the National Mall, organizers have not put together an extensive list of banned items, however there will be no alcohol, glass or drones allowed.

The federal government will be open during the parade but the White House is encouraging agencies to grant employees two hours off during the festivities. More details can be found below.

As with any big parade, there will be a slew of street closures and parking restrictions. Here’s what you need to know before the parade kicks off.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)