New EV Charging Corridor Launches Between D.C. and Boston (9-10-18)

Nissan and EVgo have completed their plan to connect the cities of Boston and Washington, D.C., with a series of nine electric vehicle (EV) fast-charging stations with 52 fast chargers in total.

The “I-95 Fast Charging ARC” is designed to give EV owners peace of mind and convenience when traveling the 500 miles between the two cities, according to EVgo.

Each station can charge up to four or more EVs simultaneously at a power output of 50 kW. The stations have also been designed and constructed to adapt to future advances in EV technology, including pre-wiring for higher charging outputs to allow easy upgrading to 150 kW fast chargers.

Read Full Story Here (via NGT News)

CAN UBER AND LYFT BECOME WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE?

(Photo: Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Lyft)

In early August, the New York City council voted to forbid Uber, Lyft, and other ride-sharing companies from adding any more cars to their fleets for the next 12 months. New York is the first American city to enact such a cap, though other cities are considering similar actions. The action took place amid the specter of six suicides by taxi drivers over the last six months and general concerns about traffic congestion in the city. Lawmakers sought to check the unregulated growth of the services and study just how many vehicles were actually required to provide appropriate transportation options during the pause.

There was, however, one important caveat to the bill that has gone largely unreported thus far: Uber and Lyft are still welcome to add as many wheelchair-accessible vehicles as they like. According to advocates for accessible transit in the future, this exception sets up a future not only for better transportation, but also for innovation around affordable wheelchair-accessible vehicle design.

Read Full Story Here (via Pacific Standard)

How Do You Get People To Trust Autonomous Vehicles? This Company Is Giving Them ‘Virtual Eyes.’ (8-29-18)

In an effort to create trust between pedestrians and self-driving vehicles, Jaguar Land Rover has developed a driverless pod with eyes that signal the vehicle’s intent to human observers. (Jaguar Land Rover) (Jaguar Landrover)

One of the biggest challenges facing car companies developing driverless vehicles has little do with sophisticated robotics or laser technology.

Instead, they must figure out how to engineer something far more amorphous but no less important: human trust, the kind that is communicated when human drivers and pedestrians make eye contact at a crosswalk.

Surveys indicate that large portions of the public harbor deep reservations about the safety of self-driving technology, so Jaguar Land Rover enlisted the help of cognitive psychologists to unpack “how vehicle behaviour affects human confidence in new technology,” the British automaker said in a news release.

(Read Full Story Here via The Washington Post)

More Shared Scooters Are Coming To The District’s Streets (8-21-18)

Rental scooters are becoming an increasingly popular way to get around Washington. (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

Love it or hate it, more electric scooters are on the way to the nation’s capital.

San Francisco-based start-up Spin, one of several companies that arrived in the District as part of the dockless bike-share hype last September, says it’s removing its bright orange bikes from city sidewalks and replacing them with scooters, an attempt to catch up with competitors who have found the scooter to be a more lucrative option than the bike.

“When given the option, demand for scooters is 10 times more than for bikes,” said Brian No, Spin’s head of public policy. “We need to focus on what the consumers really want.”

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)