Could AI-Powered Traffic Cameras Finally Stop Distracted Driving? (2-3-19)

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The other evening as I worked in a coffee shop on a busy intersection at rush hour in Washington, DC, I was struck by the sheer magnitude of the number of drivers passing by that were looking down at their phones. Over the hour I watched, at least half of the drivers who were stopped at the red light looked down at their phone screens at least once, hurriedly scrolling and typing away, entirely oblivious to the fact that the light had turned green until they received a helpful honk from the car behind. When the light was green at least a quarter of those passing through were glancing down at their phones or fixated on some knob or dial on their console, glancing up only sporadically to see if the car ahead was braking. While driverless cars may eventually free us to spend our commutes entirely on our phones, in the meantime, could AI-powered traffic cameras finally rid of the dangers of distracted drivers?

Read Full Story Here (via Forbes)

D.C. Gets A Dedicated Vision Zero Office And Director Following Spike In Traffic Deaths (1-22-19)

Road sign in the street of Washington DC, USA. It is located near the National Mall on one of the main streets.[/caption]

As part of D.C.’s effort to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2024, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) is setting up a new Vision Zero office that will focus on safety strategies, including through engineering, regulation, and community engagement.

Starting in March, the office’s inaugural director will be Linda Bailey, who was most recently the executive director of the National Association of City Transportation Officials, a group of more than 60 North American cities, Mayor Muriel Bowser announced last week. Bailey has helped shape policies around street design, bike infrastructure, public space, and sustainable stormwater systems, per Bowser’s office. Her resume includes “work on the accommodation of autonomous vehicles”—which Ford is anticipated to begin testing in the District this year.

Read Full Story Here (via Curbed)

Best Ride Sharing Apps To Make Your Commute A Breeze (1-12-19)

Today, everybody is in a hurry and doesn’t have time to pay heed to even their personal priorities. In these times, owning a car definitely is an arduous task. As per International Energy Associationreport, it is projected there will be around 1.7 billion cars on the road by 2035, the rest you can imagine.

So in order to get rid of all these hassles, you can simply shift on to carpooling or ride sharing apps, which will even cater to you with different options like sedans and SUVs.

In simple words, the ride sharing service can be defined as an arrangement between a vehicle owner and an individual who provides a pickup location with their desired destination through an app or website, for a fee.

Read Full Story Here (via Mobile App Daily)

District Is Ramping Up Street Safety Measures For The New Year (1-5-19)

Traffic is seen along 13th Street NW. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)

After a year marked by a rise in traffic fatalities, the District is entering 2019 with a plan city officials hope will make streets safer for its 700,000 residents and the hundreds of thousands more who visit and work in the nation’s capital.

The new year brings several street safety initiatives, including a ban on right turns on red and restricting left turns at some intersections. In addition, pedestrians will have more time to cross at many intersections and there will be new zones for delivery trucks and ride-hailing drop-offs. Drivers who break traffic laws will also face higher penalties.

The ultimate goal, city officials said, is to reduce traffic deaths and injuries through changes in street design, enforcement, education and data-driven strategies.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)

5 of the Most Accessible Cities in the United States (11-29-18)

Two pretty young women on handicap scooters. Sisters enjoying their mobility on an afternoon ride through the neighborhood.

According to the most recent statistics, about 12.8 percent of the population in the United States has a disability of some kind. Seniors are especially affected by disability, with 41.4 percent of the disabled population being 65 years of age and older.

Despite the numbers of those with disabilities, the battle for disability rights is still a huge issue. Some disabled people feel the communities in which they live are not doing enough to become more accessible. According to one survey, 20 percent of the respondents living in New York City said they face barriers when trying to access buildings or transportation. There are however, some cities throughout the country that are doing their best to provide access for those with disabilities.  Here are five such cities.

Read Full Story Here (via Global News)