Best Ride Sharing Apps To Make Your Commute A Breeze (1-12-19)

Today, everybody is in a hurry and doesn’t have time to pay heed to even their personal priorities. In these times, owning a car definitely is an arduous task. As per International Energy Association report, it is projected there will be around 1.7 billion cars on the road by 2035, the rest you can imagine.

So in order to get rid of all these hassles, you can simply shift on to carpooling or ride sharing apps, which will even cater to you with different options like sedans and SUVs.

In simple words, the ride sharing service can be defined as an arrangement between a vehicle owner and an individual who provides a pickup location with their desired destination through an app or website, for a fee.

Read Full Story Here (via Mobile App Daily)

New App Offers One Stop For Subway, Ride-Hailing, Bike-Share And Carpooling (1-7-19)

HERE Technologies’s mobility division has launched an app for a variety of transportation. (Fredrick Kunkle/Washington, D.C.)

A tech company launched an app Monday that offers public and private options to help people get around, including subway, buses, bike-share, ride-hailing companies and even temporary carpooling arrangements using a person’s social network.

The SoMo app — short for social mobility — is the work of HERE Mobility, a division of HERE Technologies specializing in GPS-related applications. Liad Itzhak, a senior vice president with the company, said the app launched in 15 cities around the world, including Los Angeles, with plans to add about five cities a month.

Itzhak said the app intends to make it easier for users to get from one place to another by presenting the widest array of options.

“What we have created with the app is the complete opposite approach in the current market,” Itzhak said.

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D.C.’s Taxi, Uber, and Lyft Drivers Suffer Severe Cutbacks in Pay During Shutdown (1-8-19)

DARROW MONTGOMERY

A D.C. taxi driver of 28 years who goes by Mr. Paul reports that the government shutdown has cut his daily pay by about 75 percent. “It’s hard to believe that some days I come home with $26,” he says. “Before the shutdown, I would be striving to make $80 to $100 every day I work.”

His rent of $1500 off Fort Lincoln Drive NE is due on the 5th of each month. He shares a two bedroom unit. He says that if he’s late on his rent, a late payment fee is applied. “The only way I paid my rent this month is because I’m borrowing. I’m very lucky that I could call my son this month and borrow.”

As he drove a City Paper reporter down 16th Street NW on Tuesday, he explained his days. “This morning, I came out at 4 a.m., and you are my second customer.” It was 8:15 a.m. “All of us are suffering, not only myself. I go down 14th Street, and no one has a passenger.”

He says that Union Station is no better. “Because there are no tourists coming in, cab drivers wait one hour, two hours, before they pick up somebody.” On Sunday night at Union Station at 8 p.m., several cabs that had been waiting to circle through the station’s taxi lane drove away without passengers. No one waited in line for a cab.

Mr. Paul says that one of the worst aspects of the shutdown is that it creates an atmosphere of uncertainty. But he doesn’t believe that this will end any time soon. “It might stay for a long time because it’s a matter of ego,” he says. “The shutdown is biting.”

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In 2019, We’ll Have Taxis Without Drivers—or Steering Wheels (1-3-19)

Illustration: Blood Bros.

A coming milestone in the automobile world is the widespread rollout of Level 4 autonomy, where the car drives itself without supervision. Waymo, the company spun out of Google’s self-driving car research, said it would start a commercial Level 4 taxi service by late 2018, although that hadn’t happened as of press time. And GM Cruise, in San Francisco, is committed to do the same in 2019, using a Chevrolet Bolt that has neither a steering wheel nor pedals.

These cars wouldn’t work in all conditions and regions—that’s why they’re on rung 4 and not rung 5 of the autonomy ladder. But within some limited operational domain, they’ll have the look and feel of a fully robotized car. The question is how constrained that domain will be.

Read Full Story Here (via IEEE Spectrum)