Congestion Pricing In Manhattan, First Such Plan In U.S., Is Close To Approval (3-25-19)

New York moved closer to formalizing a congestion pricing plan for Manhattan, as the leader of the State Assembly indicated on Monday that his members were “ready to go forward.” Dave Sanders for The New York Times

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ALBANY — After years of hesitation, New York is poised to become the first city in the United States to introduce congestion pricing, which would put new electronic tolls in place for drivers entering the busiest stretches of Manhattan.

Though state leaders have not ironed out details, they had reached consensus on Monday that the plan was necessary to help pay for much-needed repairs to the city’s beleaguered subway system.

The proceeds from congestion pricing are expected to enable the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which operates the city’s public transit network, to raise billions of dollars in bonds to modernize the antiquated subway. Such a windfall overwhelmed lingering concerns about various aspects of the plan, including the cost to commuters in the boroughs and suburbs outside Manhattan who rely on cars.

Other American cities are exploring variations of congestion pricing, including Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. The idea dates back decades, with supporters often pointing to an array of health, safety and environmental benefits, including reducing air pollution and pedestrian injuries, and alleviating the stranglehold on gridlocked city streets.

Read Full Story Here (via NY Times)

How to Find Wheelchair-Accessible Ubers (3-25-19)

Photo: Stephanie Keith (Getty Images)

Let’s face it—we take ride-hailing apps like Uber for granted. In less than three minutes’ time, we can hail a ride with a few phone clicks. It’s like magic.

But for those who require wheelchairs, scooters, or other mobility-assistance devices, historically, there’s been an enormous gap with regard to fair and equal access to accessible transportation. In 2018, a number of lawsuits by disabilities rights advocates have alleged that Uber has long discriminated against those in wheelchairs.

Read Full Story Here (via Life Hacker)

Metro Moves To Subsidize Late-Night Rides On Uber And Lyft As A Substitute For Rail Service (3-14-19)

For the past few years, Metro has closed its rail system before midnight on Sundays through Thursdays and at 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, the result of scheduling more repair work overnight to address maintenance and safety issues. Those service hours have forced many late-night workers in the region, including those in the hospitality and healthcare industries, to take Metrorail alternatives in the early morning, from Uber and Lyft to taxis and carpools.

Now, Metro is aiming to alleviate the inconvenience from its shortened hours by subsidizing on-demand rides that late-night workers take within its service area. The transit agency has released a solicitation for companies that could provide discounted rides for these workers, between midnight and 4 a.m. seven days a week. Through a one-year pilot program, Metro would fund up to $1 million in subsidized rides, guaranteeing $3 per ride for up to 10 weekly rides for an individual late-night worker. The program could kick off as soon as this summer.

Read Full Story Here (via Curbed)

How to Get Around DC During the 2019 National Cherry Blossom Festival (3-6-19)

FILE – In this April 11, 2015, file photo, the Washington Monument is seen through cherry blossoms across the Tidal Basin in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

In an annual D.C. tradition that signals the start of spring, thousands of people will descend upon the National Mall and Tidal Basin for the National Cherry Blossom Festival, March 20 to April 14.

Locals and out-of-towners alike should expect large crowds, but there are several viable options for getting around there. Here’s some guidance in finding your path of least resistance.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)