Waymo Launches Nation’s First Commercial Self-Driving Taxi Service In Arizona (12-5-18)

A pickup site for the driverless Waymo taxis in the Phoenix suburbs. (Michael Laris/The Washington Post)

 On the chilly October day the New York City subway opened in 1904, the marvel of engineering and grit was greeted with horns, steam sirens and stations overrun by thousands of revelers. “Fast Trains in Tubes,” blared one headline.

On Wednesday, 114 years later in sun-swept Arizona, the launch of the 21st-century equivalent came in a blog post and an email invitation.

Google offshoot Waymo announced it is launching the nation’s first commercial self-driving taxi service in this and other Phoenix suburbs. The 24/7 service, dubbed Waymo One, will let customers summon self-driving minivans by a smartphone app, a la Uber or Lyft.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)

Bikeshare, Scooters, Cars, Trains, Bridges: One Agency to Rule Them All (11-30-18)

A bus at San Francisco’s new bus terminal, opened this year. In San Francisco one agency controls nearly every form of transport within city boundaries. Lorin Eleni Gill/AP

The current management of transportation in American cities is, to put it mildly, balkanized. Powers to regulate, tax, and allocate budgets for modes like transit, automobiles, and taxis are divided across numerous transit authorities, state agencies, and city departments. The predictable result: organizational friction and confusion about who is ultimately responsible for achieving policy goals such as equity, safety, and the reduction of pollution and congestion.

This situation is not sustainable, especially in an era when new mobility services like ride-hail and scooters have made the pursuit of regional mobility goals more challenging—and more important—than ever before. It’s time to consider a dramatic step: consolidation of all mobility oversight into a single regional authority.

Read Full Story Here (via CityLab)

A Lot Of Cities Want Roboshuttles, Including D.C. But Will They Work? (11-25-18)

Olli, an automated shuttle, stands outside the offices of Local Motors in National Harbor, Md., on Nov. 20. The vehicles run about 10 mph and are seen as a gateway to greater automation. (Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post)

From the Mall to Lincoln, Neb., planners across the United States are pushing slow-rolling roboshuttles as a way to dip their toes into greater automation.

The stubby, bread-box-looking vehicles go about 10 mph, and boosters say they’re a relatively easy and potentially transformative tool for moving people, even as autonomous cars, trucks and minivans continue their development and rollout. Others counsel caution, raising concerns about safety, oversight and economic viability, and fears about adding congestion to roadways and eliminating jobs.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)