New DC Signs Banning Right Turns On Red To Go Up Starting Feb. 19 (2-11-19)

WASHINGTON — “No right turn on red” signs will start going up in dozens of new D.C. locations starting Feb. 19, as long as weather permits.

The District Department of Transportation is banning right turns on red at about 100 new intersections throughout the city, and the signs will be installed over the next six months by the end of July.

The effort supports Mayor Muriel Bowser’s Vision Zero Initiative that was launched in 2016, aimed at eliminating traffic deaths and serious injuries in the nation’s capital by 2024.

“We have taken a number of approaches to make intersections across the District safer, and banning right turns on red in over 100 intersections is one of those approaches,” DDOT Director Jeff Marootian told WTOP.

Could AI-Powered Traffic Cameras Finally Stop Distracted Driving? (2-3-19)

Getty Images. GETTY

The other evening as I worked in a coffee shop on a busy intersection at rush hour in Washington, DC, I was struck by the sheer magnitude of the number of drivers passing by that were looking down at their phones. Over the hour I watched, at least half of the drivers who were stopped at the red light looked down at their phone screens at least once, hurriedly scrolling and typing away, entirely oblivious to the fact that the light had turned green until they received a helpful honk from the car behind. When the light was green at least a quarter of those passing through were glancing down at their phones or fixated on some knob or dial on their console, glancing up only sporadically to see if the car ahead was braking. While driverless cars may eventually free us to spend our commutes entirely on our phones, in the meantime, could AI-powered traffic cameras finally rid of the dangers of distracted drivers?

Read Full Story Here (via Forbes)

Ford’s Self-Driving Cars Are Really Good, But Are They Good Enough To Win? (11-15-18)

It was a humid, overcast day in Miami, and I needed to get from the city’s crowded downtown to the trendy, mural-splashed neighborhood of Wynwood. I pulled out my phone, tapped an app, and hailed a self-driving car. A few minutes later, a Ford Fusion crowned with cameras and high-powered sensors crawled up to the curb. The street sign above me read “No Parking: Autonomous Vehicles Only.” Good thing: I got in, buckled up, and away we went.

Read Full Story Here (via The Verge)

Uber-ing With A Child: Site Details Various Seat Laws Around DC, Nation (11-1-18)

The advent of ride-booking services like Lyft and Uber has raised questions about how parents can get around with their little ones safely and legally. (Getty Images/iStockphoto/MementoImage)

WASHINGTON — The advent of ride-booking (or “ride-sharing”) services, such as Lyft and Uber, has revolutionized how people earn money and, of course, how they get from point A to point B.

The answers, unfortunately, are not abundantly clear: Child-restraint guidelines vary nationwide.

“It can be a challenge to figure out what the rules are for transporting kids in a ride-share vehicle, as the laws vary from state to state,” said Justin Owens, a research scientist at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute’s Center for Vulnerable Road User Safety.

“Where the confusion comes in is that in most of those states, it is unclear whether those laws also include ride-share vehicles — if ride shares are counted as taxis or not.”

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)

24/7 Uber and Lyft pickup zones coming to D.C. (10-26-18)

The District is launching new pickup and drop-off zones for ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

The District is designating curbside space for ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft at locations across the city — an effort to reduce the number of vehicles that stop to pick up and drop off passengers in bike lanes, crosswalks and travel lanes.

The District Department of Transportation is adding the pickup and drop-off zones at five entertainment hot spots where visitors are dependent on the services to get around. Those sites are the nightlife hub of 14th and U streets, the National Zoo and Georgetown in Northwest, the Wharf waterfront development in Southwest and Union Market in Northeast.

The 24-hour-a-day zones will also be used for commercial loading, officials said. They are expected to go live later this year, following a public comment period and the installation of signs.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)