The Future Of Medical Transportation Is Ride-Sharing (5-20-18)

A Lyft Driver In San Francisco

Parker said it is getting harder for elderly people — especially those with significant others who may be around the same age — to get to medical appointments or hospitals. “It’s much easier to put him in a ride-share and for [his wife] to assist him,” he said.

As the population ages and the demand for healthcare rises, the future of medical transportation is in ride-sharing services, experts say. Such arrangements will be a topic of conversation at Bisnow’s National Healthcare West event June 7 at the JW Marriott in Los Angeles. Though there is a huge demand to develop medical facilities around public transportation stops, not enough healthcare providers are doing it yet, Parker said.

And living in car-centric Los Angeles, Parker said people still prefer using cars rather than public transportation, especially for a medical appointment or a minor procedure. “There’s an Orange [bus] line here that takes people all over the Valley but we’re not seeing any medical facilities being built around that line,” he said. “We haven’t seen that kind of development.” Missed appointments cost the healthcare industry $150B each year, according to several healthcare reports.  The reasons for the no-shows vary — mostly from the patient side, such as forgotten appointments due to too much time between visits, a distrust of seeing a doctor, cost and other reasons.

But one of the single biggest reasons is lack of transportation.

Read Full Story Here (via BisNow)

New MicroTransit Vans To Offer Service In D.C. Including Fixed And On-Demand Routes (5-17-18)

MicroTransit vans will offer service in Washington, D.C.

The vans will have fixed routes around the area, including at Union Station. On-demand routes will be available in neighborhoods for $3.25 per ride.

People interested in driving for MicroTransit have to apply by June 29.

ABC7’s Sam Sweeney has more on this story in the above video.

Read Full Story Here (via WJLA)

Venture Capitalists Pour Money Into Urban Mobility To Solve ‘Last-Mile’ Issue (5-18-18)

With the “last-mile” problem having vexed urban dwellers for decades, venture capitalists are seizing the opportunity to fund projects that could fill in gaps that public transit cannot meet.

Sometimes the last mile of a trip in an urban area is the most difficult. While trying to reach your destination after exiting public transit, options dwindle or become less convenient. Why hail and Uber or Lyft for just a mile? Walking may take too long or is unappealing because of the weather or other factors, and there aren’t any buses or traditional taxis nearby. It may be the point at which frustration sets in.

With the “last-mile” problem having vexed urban dwellers for decades, venture capitalists are seizing the opportunity to fund projects that could fill in gaps that public transit cannot meet. Bikesharing and electric scooters are two common methods used to help commuters snake through city streets when other options have been exhausted or are inconvenient.

Read Full Story Here (via The Fuse)

Autonomous Taxis: Who Will Reap the Revenues and Profits from the Boom Ahead? (2-22-18)

Autonomous vehicles will transform personal mobility by slashing the cost per mile relative to a traditional taxi, Uber, or personal car, according to ARK’s research. Here, we evaluate which firms will reap the benefits of a new market which promises to ramp from essentially $0 now to $10 trillion in global gross annual revenues by 2030.1

We expect four types of firms to get a cut of the estimated $0.352 in revenue per mile that autonomous taxis will charge: platform providers, lead generators, vehicle manufacturers, and owner/operators, as shown below. Some companies probably will benefit from more than one source of revenues.

Read Full Story Here (via Ark Invest)

This DC Taxi Driver Was a Superstar in Ethiopia (2-12-18)

Left: Photo collage by a fan (unknown) at the Hilton Hotel, late 1960s. Right: Hailu Mergia today.

In the 60s and 70s, Hailu Mergia was a famous musician in Africa. But famine in the 80s forced him to move to the US. Now he’s poised for a comeback.

As a young man living in Addis Ababa during the swinging 60s, Hailu Mergia was a superstar. The Ethiopian capital city was a bustling cosmopolis where art and culture flourished amid the country’s uneasy quest for independence.

His jazz and funk band, The Walias, performed for the domestic and international elite at the then-prestigious Hilton Hotel’s music club, which granted residencies to Ethiopia’s hottest bands. Crowds of dignitaries and foreign diplomats, Hollywood movie stars, famous musicians like Duke Ellington and Alice Coltrane, and important African figures like Manu Dibango would flock to the hotel to dance and jam until sunrise.

Read Full Story Here (via VICE)