Uber Adds Public Transit Info To App, Starting In Denver (2-1-19)

Dive Brief:

  • In partnership with Denver’s Regional Transportation District (RTD), Uber is putting bus and train schedules, directions and expected fares into its app, the company announced in a blog post. Eventually, users will be able to buy RTD tickets directly through the app.
  • Uber is promising to expand its transit information to more cities in collaboration with Moovit, a transit data and route planning platform, and Masabi, a ticketing and payment provider.
  • “Our customers want their trips to be as seamless as possible, and a collaboration like this one allows them to plan for travel from end to end, including additional first mile and last mile options,” RTD CEO and General Manager David Genova said in a statement.

Read Full Story Here (via Smart Cities Dive)

Bikeshare, Scooters, Cars, Trains, Bridges: One Agency to Rule Them All (11-30-18)

A bus at San Francisco’s new bus terminal, opened this year. In San Francisco one agency controls nearly every form of transport within city boundaries. Lorin Eleni Gill/AP

The current management of transportation in American cities is, to put it mildly, balkanized. Powers to regulate, tax, and allocate budgets for modes like transit, automobiles, and taxis are divided across numerous transit authorities, state agencies, and city departments. The predictable result: organizational friction and confusion about who is ultimately responsible for achieving policy goals such as equity, safety, and the reduction of pollution and congestion.

This situation is not sustainable, especially in an era when new mobility services like ride-hail and scooters have made the pursuit of regional mobility goals more challenging—and more important—than ever before. It’s time to consider a dramatic step: consolidation of all mobility oversight into a single regional authority.

Read Full Story Here (via CityLab)

Road closures, parking restrictions ahead of MLB All-Star Game

WASHINGTON — D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, Police Chief Peter Newsham and District Department of Transportation Director Jeff Marootian announced a host of preparation plans ahead of next week’s MLB All-Star Game — which include road closures, new parking restrictions, and transit changes.

“It’s a big summer for sports fans in Washington,” Bowser said. “As always, throughout the All-Star Week festivities, our goal is to ensure the safety of  residents and visitors.”

Newsham said the city and its police department are ready with increased staffing of both uniformed and plain clothed officers to monitor activity around All-Star related events and closures.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)

What If You Could Plan And Pay For You Trip Around The DC Area With One Click? (7-9-18)

Metro bus makes it way down 16th street in in downtown Washington, Wednesday, March 16, 2016. The Metro subway system that serves the nation’s capital and its Virginia and Maryland suburbs shut down for a full-day fo an emergency safety inspection of its third-rail power cables. Making for unusual commute, as the lack of service is forcing some people on the roads, while others are staying home or teleworking. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

WASHINGTON — A powerful business group that has thrown its support behind Metro funding and toll lanes from Richmond to Baltimore is now calling for changes to unify how we pay to get around.

In a document being released Monday, the Greater Washington Partnership asks transportation systems across the region to unify payments in a single interchangeable way that would allow one-click planning and purchase of a trip that could feature bike share, scooters, Metro, commuter rail and buses.

“What we want, ultimately, is one seamless integrated platform for folks to be able to plan for and pay for a trip across all public and private transport options in the capital region of Baltimore to Richmond,” the group’s Transportation Policy Director Joe McAndrew said.

Read Full Story Here (via WTOP)

Bus Startup Skedaddle Reportedly Held Acquisition Talks With Uber (7-6-18)

Courtesy of Skedaddle

While all eyes are on electric scooters, bus startups are quietly making moves.

Uber has been in discussions to acquire Skedaddle, a crowdsourced bus company, for more than a month, according to an Axios report.

Skedaddle first crossed my radar in January 2017 when the startup was set to transport more than 11,000 people to and from the Women’s March on Washington. At the time, CEO Adam Nestler said, “The alternative for many of the people in these communities is trying to figure out carpools or chartering buses on their own.”

Here’s how it works: To book a ride, a user logs into the Skedaddle app and puts in a route (i.e. New York City to D.C.) as well as a desired pickup location and time. As long as nine other people sign up for the same route ahead of the departure, the ride is booked.

At the time, I described Skeddadle as “the Uber Pool of buses, shuttles, and other large vehicles.” The startup’s goal is to make city-to-city travel easier for users and take advantage of the glut of charter vehicles that sit underused in parking lots most of the time, Nestler said in January.

Read Full Story Here (via Fortune)