Metro Plan Would Subsidize Uber And Lyft Fares To Fill Late-Night Service Gap (2-13-19)

(Gene J. Puskar/AP)

Metro would subsidize an Uber, Lyft or other on-demand trip for late-night workers under a plan the agency is proposing to the ride-hail services.

The subsidized trips — up to $3 per ride — are meant to make up for the loss of late-night service but would be available only to workers, not people out enjoying entertainment or events.

Metro, which has been criticized by riders and D.C. officials for wanting to extend its moratorium on late-night service another year and use the extra time to catch up on maintenance, is expected to issue a request for proposals soon that will outline its goals for the estimated $1 million program.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Post)

Brookfield To Introduce Self-Driving Cars At Massive Northern Virginia Development (2-8-19)

Courtesy of Brookfield A rendering of the Optimus Ride self-driving car in front of the Wegmans at Brookfield’s Reston development.

One of the world’s largest real estate firms will roll out self-driving vehicles at a huge property it owns in Northern Virginia this summer.

Brookfield Properties announced Thursday it will deploy Optimus Ride self-driving cars at an office park in Reston where it plans to launch a $1.4B development.

The vehicles will be introduced in June at One Reston Crescent and Two Reston Crescent, the two existing office buildings on the 36-acre site where Brookfield is planning a 3.5M SF mixed-use project.

Read Full Story Here (via Bisnow)

Lyft Introduces ‘Green Mode’ To Put Riders In EVs, Hybrids (2-9-19)

Dive Brief:

  • Lyft is introducing a new “Green Mode” that will let passengers request an electric or hybrid vehicle as part of the platform’s goal to get a billion rides per year in electric cars by 2025. The green option is live in Seattle and will spread to other cities soon.
  • Drivers will be able to access electric vehicles (EVs) through Lyft’s Express Drive program, which allows users to rent vehicles to drive for Lyft.
  • Lyft announced this fall it would go carbon neutral by moving to renewable energy and purchasing carbon offsets to “neutralize the remainder of [its] emissions.” As part of that goal, the company says all EV charging will be done with renewable energy.

Read Full Story Here (via Smart Cities Dive)

Uber Adds Public Transit Info To App, Starting In Denver (2-1-19)

Dive Brief:

  • In partnership with Denver’s Regional Transportation District (RTD), Uber is putting bus and train schedules, directions and expected fares into its app, the company announced in a blog post. Eventually, users will be able to buy RTD tickets directly through the app.
  • Uber is promising to expand its transit information to more cities in collaboration with Moovit, a transit data and route planning platform, and Masabi, a ticketing and payment provider.
  • “Our customers want their trips to be as seamless as possible, and a collaboration like this one allows them to plan for travel from end to end, including additional first mile and last mile options,” RTD CEO and General Manager David Genova said in a statement.

Read Full Story Here (via Smart Cities Dive)

How Ride-Hailing Is Changing Urban Mobility (1-28-19)

Ride-hailing services are one example of how urban transportation is changing. Their rapid growth is easy to understand. The people who use them like the convenience of being able to summon a ride on-demand with a smart phone app.

There’s also a very real chance they are or will be disruptive for city transportation networks: the buses, taxis, light-rail, subways and personal vehicles most of us are more accustomed to. That’s why we’re sharing highlights from an analysis conducted by the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Council Advisor Arizona State University (ASU) on the ride-hailing phenomenon.

The study doesn’t claim to have all the answers. However, it offers city leaders and transportation planners a better understanding of who is using the services, where they’re being used, trends and where more research is needed.

Read Full Story Here (via American City & County)