The Vision 2020 Challenge

The Department of For-Hire Vehicles is embarking on an initiative to ensure District residents achieve transportation equity. This objective means removing barriers to access transit service. The agency has continued to modernize the taxi fleet with the transition to a digital platform. We have provided financial incentives to expand economic opportunities and address market changes. In addition, we supported pilot programs to meet the transportation needs of people with disabilities, veterans, District government employees, and foster children. So get ready for Vision 2020. Stay tuned to learn more. The evolution of your ride is being driven by DFHV.

Turns Out Uber And Lyft Might Not Be Ruining The American City (1-31-18)

FILIPPO MANARESI/GETTY IMAGES

THIS IS HOW quickly transportation has changed in urban America. In July 2010, a service called UberCab went live in San Francisco—that’s fewer than eight years ago. Washington, DC’s Capital Bikeshare, the country’s largest bike-sharing program, really got off the ground in 2010. Austin became the first US city to host car-sharing service Car2Go a few months into the same year. Lyft launched in SF in June 2012.

That’s a ton more travel options in a short time, most of them enabled by the explosion of the smartphone and fostered somewhere in the Bay Area. Some have indubitably made it easier, cheaper, and safer for residents to travel through dense cities. But for city governments that feel responsible for getting all their residents around, the sudden burst of diversity has confused the whole picture.

Read Full Story Here (via Wired)

Cities Partner With Apps To Create Their Own Ridesharing Services (1-25-18)

Many cities have bus systems, but they’re not always well-utilized by the majority of residents. The city of Arlington, Texas, located just outside Dallas, for example, had a single bus route — and discovered that most of its riders were students at the University of Texas branch there.

So, late last year, Arlington voted to end the route and replaced it with a ridesharing service in December. Like a few communities in the U.S., Arlington went with Via, a technology developer and provider of dynamic on-demand shared rides, to provide the network technology.

Using the Via technology, riders in Arlington are able to get a seat in one of 10 six-passenger vans roving city streets for a $3 fare. Riders who don’t have a smartphone can use a dial-in phone number, which is available in addition to the app.

Read Full Story Here (via PYMNTS)

When Cars Fly: Uber CEO Says In 10 Years (1-23-18)

Uber’s CEO is making a bold prediction, stating that within the next decade, ride-sharing customers will be chauffeured around in flying cars.

“There will be people flying around Dallas, Texas,” CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said at the DLD tech conference in Munich, according to Bloomberg Technology. “I think it’s going to happen within the next 10 years.”

Read Full Story Here (via PYMNTS)

If They Try It, They’ll Like It: How Ridesharing, Autonomous Cars Will Win Over the Public (1-23-18)

The Aptiv-Lyft vehicle with autonomous technology drives on the strip in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by John F. Martin for Aptiv)

Five years ago, when she was still an insurance broker with Marsh, Kate Sampson called insurance underwriters at American International Group (AIG) and other insurers with a new concept.

“I’m working with this company and this is what they’re going to do. They’re going to be the first in peer‑to‑peer ridesharing and everyone will have an app and you can share a ride with a stranger,” she told the underwriters.

Read Full Story Here (via Insurance Journal)