Report: Seven In 10 D.C. Residents Have Positive View Of Electric Scooters (7-25-18)

Photo by Tyrone Turner / WAMU.

There’s been some loud griping about the electric scooters that started making their way to D.C. sidewalks this winter, but those squeaky wheels are not representative of the District’s broader feelings, according to a new survey.

About 72 percent of Washingtonians have a positive view of e-scooters, putting the city near the middle of those surveyed by Populus. The transportation data and analytics firm surveyed 7,000 people for its findings (most of those surveyed had not taken the scooters for a spin). As you can see below, D.C.’s high rate of good vibes for the two-wheelers is not unusual, per the survey.

Read Full Story Here (via DCist)

General Motors Jumps Into Peer-To-Peer Car Sharing (7-24-18)

Helen H. Richardson | The Denver Post | Getty Images. A Chevy Volt and a GMC Acadia, parked on Little Raven Court, are available for car share through a new app from Maven in Denver.

Looking to make money renting out your car or truck?

General Motors thinks a lot of people are interested in making cash off their car, which is why the automaker announced Tuesday it is launching a peer-to-peer car-share business.

The business will operate under the company’s Maven brand, which already has a more traditional car-share business in several cities and more than 150,000 users.

For GM, expanding into peer-to-peer car sharing is the latest move to develop new revenue streams and business lines to complement the company’s core business, which is selling new vehicles.

Read Full Story Here (via CNBC)

Uber, Lyft Expanding To Bikes, Scooters (7-23-18)

Uber and Lyft are expanding their vision of ride-sharing to include not just cars but bicycles, electric bicycles, and electric scooters.

Uber jumped in first, adding the electric bikeshare company Jump to its app earlier this year in San Francisco and then acquiring the company outright in March for an estimated $100 million.

Lyft earlier this month bought Motivate, the nation’s largest bikeshare company, with operations in such cities as Boston, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, DC. The value of the deal was estimated at $250 million.

And California-based Lime announced recently that its bikes and scooters would also begin appearing on the Uber app and that several investors, including Uber, Fidelity, and Alphabet, the parent of Google, had invested $335 million in the company. The investment suggested the company is now valued at more than $1 billion.

“Our investment and partnership in Lime is another step towards our vision of becoming a one-stop shop for all your transportation needs,” said Rachel Holt, an Uber vice president.

Read Full Story Here (via CommonWealth)

It’s Too Soon to Regulate Self-Driving Cars, Says U.S. Safety Official

 

It’s premature to regulate the self-driving vehicles being tested by companies such as General Motors Co. and Waymo LLC, the U.S. government’s top auto safety official said.

“At this point the technology is so nascent I don’t think it is appropriate today to regulate this technology,” Heidi King, deputy administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said in an interview. “It’s not there yet, but each and every day we are open to identifying when the time is right.”

D.C. Officials To Stretch ‘Car Free Day’ Into Two Days (7-18-18)

In this Feb. 13, 2018 photo, a woman walks past a dockless bike parked outside of the Commerce Department in Washington. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise. But the dockless bikes are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that don’t require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) kicked off a new season of anything-but-car travel Wednesday by approving funds for alternative transportation projects and accepting a plan to stretch this year’s “Car Free Day” into two days.

Read Full Story Here (via The Washington Times)